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Celtic Mythology as example of Promethean Transmission – The Apollonian Transmission


The tone of the Celtic myth, as it has come down to us, is wholly distinct from the Norse myth. Here we encounter less youthful anxiety, cataclysmic violence, gallows’ humor and simple madness. Though there is certainly violence and warriorhood.

Readers may not have to be reminded that the Celts, particularly in the regions from which these myths originate, such as Ireland and Wales, are of a more admixed nature than the Nordic types that would come to dominate. Here “Phoenician” admixture is perhaps likely. The Pataikoi that the Phoenicians bore on the front of their ships, refers to the proto-Jewish Ptah or Vulcan. This is all we need to know.

Here we see a “Germanic tribe” at a different life stage, with a Semitic admixture more far advanced. Perhaps as well, in some cases, distance from a potent and militarized empire creates a calmer tone. With the Chthonic figure of Dagda, a figure whom bears a cauldron and a club or hammer, we find that the Semitic element has ascended. Here he is the Chieftain God.

Indeed, the Interpretatio Romana records the Gauls or Celts to have followed Heracles or Mercury. The Cauldron as well as a symbol, often connected to the Holy Grail, plays saliently in Celtic myth. Here it even appears as a cauldron of rebirth, a central vaginal symbol, where men enter and emerge changed, sometimes for the worse. Here we find “baptism,” intermixture and so forth. Here we find some Jungian precedent for America’s “Melting Pot” which may have developed as a conscious reference to symbols also found in Vulcan’s forge.

People will point to the Apollonian nature of Celtic myth and especially to figures like Lugh and the hero Cuchulain. Again, Dagda is king here. They are in the end more “Michaeline” and “Angelic” than Apollonian. Cuchulain, for his part, derives his name from Culann. His name means Culann’s hound. Culann is a Vulcanian smith figure, like Regin, under whom the Apollonian Sigurd apprentices.

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People will point to the Apollonian nature of Celtic myth and especially to figures like Lugh and the hero Cuchulain. Again, Dagda is king here. They are in the end more “Michaeline” and “Angelic” than Apollonian. Cuchulain, for his part, derives his name from Culann. His name means Culann’s hound. Culann is a Vulcanian smith figure, like Regin, under whom the Apollonian Sigurd apprentices.

Yet the dramatic conflict that appears between Regin and Sigurd on the eve of Ragnarok is absent here. The Celts went quietly into the night, becoming less and less meaningful peoples on the world stage. Indeed, Celtic Myth is a world obsessed with the afterworld and otherworlds, where the veil between reality and dream is paper thin. The Arthurian Avalon, for example, comes especially from this myth body and not from a blood hungry Valhalla. Here again we see the “down going.”

The Tuatha de Danann though become the final symbol of the Celts. Here it is understood a noble, ancient race of Elves, ceded the world, went to live in sidhes underground. In plain English, the more racially youthful Nordic element disappeared. It is correct to relate the Tuatha de Danann to the Light Elves of Norse myth, noble, sacrificing, dwindling, Angelic Nords under Semitic direction.

Norse myth is intelligent, clever, witty, brutal Celtic myth is astonishingly beautiful and enchanting if also wane and tragic. We require beautiful, intelligent and Aryan. The only sadness in our Art is that that depicts the passing of a great and worthy enemy, because, tragically, it was either us or him. We learn from everything with the discerning eye, with Interpretatio Romana.

 

 





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